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FL Contractor 60hr prelicensure

FL DBPR Construction Industry license info

A Pool's Best Friend, Inc. Pool/Spa Servicing Contractor 60hr Course

FL DBPR CILB Lic#CRS12503 Course#0613802

Classes will be offered Wed/Thur on a 4 week rotational schedule in Clearwater, FL, Join anytime.

Classes may be taken in any order as your schedule allows other than CPO class.

Day 1 8hrs ref 9-24 PHTA CPO

Oct 20, Nov 17, Jan 5, Feb 2

Day 2 8hrs ref 25-40 PHTA CPO

Oct 21, Nov 18, Jan 6, Feb 3

Day 3 7.5hrs ref 41-55

Oct 27, Dec 1, Jan 12, Feb 9

Day 4 7hrs ref 76-89

Oct 28, Dec 2, Jan 13, Feb 10

Day 5 8hrs ref 90-105

Nov 3, Dec 8, Jan 19, Feb 16

Day 6 7.5hrs ref 106-120

Nov 4, Dec 9, Jan 20, Feb 17

Day 7 7hrs ref 1-8 & 56-61

Nov 10, Dec 15, Jan 26, Feb 23

Day 8 7hrs ref 62-75

Nov 11, Dec 16, Jan 27, Feb 24

Day

Ref

Length

Description

 

 

4hrs total

61G4-15.001Qualification for Certification

(a) One (1) hour each of instruction covering

 

 

 

Workers’ compensation insurance

7

1

25m

What is workers comp – Who it covers, how it works and where to get.

7

2

25m

When you must provide it– Understanding exemptions and when you must provide.

 

 

 

Workplace safety

7

3

25m

Employee and vehicle safety– Training, safety meetings, providing PPE and vehicle monitoring.

7

4

25m

Customer and store safety– Safe displays, chemical storage as well as your parking and loading areas must be considered.

 

 

 

Contracting business practices

7

5

25m

Contracts and what they do– How they protect your business and you.

7

6

25m

Binding Arbitration what is it– State run program administered by the Florida Swimming Pool Association.

 

 

 

Pool safety equipment provisions of Chapter 515, F.S., and the Florida Building Code

7

7

25m

Chapter 515, F.S. Residential Swimming Pool Safety Act– Review and discuss compliance.

7

8

25m

FL building code– Current code revisions and updates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

16hrs total

(b) Sixteen (16) hours of instruction consisting of the Certified Pool Operator (CPO) Course of the National Swimming Pool Foundation now known as the Pool & Hot Tub Alliance (PHTA)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 1 in class per PHTA guidelines accepted by FL Dept. Of Health

1

9

25m

Pool & Spa Management– Running your facility and how a CPO on staff meets FL regulations and can help reduce facility liability

1

10

25m

Regulations & Guidelines– FL DOH is not the only agency you have to be aware of. What about the ADA, CPSC, EPA, OSHA, and CDC just to name a few others

1

11

25m

Essential Calculations– Basic arithmetic and conversions to properly use volume and chemical dosing formulas

1

12

25m

Essential Calculations– Calculating pool surface area and volume for proper equipment sizing, evaporative losses and chemical dosing

1

13

25m

Pool Water Contamination– Awareness of the fecal and non-fecal contaminates that cause recreational water illnesses.

1

14

25m

Disinfection– Explain chlorine chemistry and byproducts.

1

15

25m

Disinfection– Explain bromine chemistry and alternative sanitizers.

1

16

25m

Water Balance– Understanding how balance factors PH, total alkalinity, calcium hardness, temperature and total dissolved solids affect pool water quality.   

1

17

25m

Saturation Index– How to use this tool to calculate water balance and correct imbalances.

1

18

25m

Pool & Spa Water Problems– Understanding oxidation and break point chlorination to correct water quality problems.

1

19

25m

Pool & Spa Water Problems– How to address staining, scale, foaming, cloudy water, and algae.

1

20

25m

Chemical Testing– Different methods and how and when to use.

1

21

25m

Chemical Feed & Control– Safe chemical application of dry, liquid and gas chemicals both manually and with feeders controlled by oxidation reduction potential or manually adjusted.

1

22

25m

Water Circulation– Explain circulation system and components.

1

23

25m

Pool & Spa Filtration types– Explain cartridge, sand and DE filters.

1

24

25m

Pool & Spa Filter sizing– Explain and calculate flow rates for the different medias for proper system sizing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 2 in class with certification test per PHTA guidelines accepted by FL Dept. of Health

 

 

 

 

2

25

25m

Pool math workbook practice calculations

2

26

25m

Review calculations & Questions

2

27

25m

Heating & Air Circulation– Explain heat gains and losses and air exchange for indoor facility air quality.

2

28

25m

FL DOH Codes & Inspections– Review FL Admin Code 64E-9 public swimming pools and bathing places and FL DOH inspection reports.  

2

29

25m

Spa & Therapy Pool Operations– Operational concerns in low volume hot water facilities require additional vigilance to maintain a safe environment.

2

30

25m

Facility Safety– Emphasize the different types of training, drowning prevention, environmental and safety equipment used to provide a safe environment in and around the pool.

2

31

25m

Chemical Handling & Safety– Covers PPE, safe storage, use, and application of chemicals we use.

2

32

25m

Keeping Records– Provide examples and discuss various documents like opening & closing checklists, daily operation, and emergency response plans.

2

33

25m

Facility Maintenance– Provide examples and discuss routine, preventive, and seasonal maintenance plans.

2

34

25m

Troubleshooting– Discuss basic troubleshooting of pumps, and filters.

2

35

25m

Facility Renovation & Design– Discuss considerations when a facility is planning a renovation.

2

36

25m

Review & Questions

2

37

25m

PHTA CPO certification testing

2

38

25m

PHTA CPO certification testing

2

39

25m

PHTA CPO certification testing

2

40

25m

PHTA CPO certification testing

 

 

 

 

 

 

40hrs total

(c) Forty (40) hours of instruction utilizing an up to date publication from any National recognized swimming pool association

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Structures – Pool Structures & Finishes; Spa & Hot Tub Structures, Finishes & Equipment Packs

 

 

 

 

3

41

25m

Commercial pool concrete construction– Timeline and discussion of project.

3

42

25m

Commercial spa concrete construction– Timeline and discussion of project.

3

43

25m

Commercial/residential pool typical aggregate surfaces– Discuss marcite, exposed aggregate, or polished.

3

44

25m

Commercial pool tile marking requirements– Discuss required markings per FAC 64E-9.

3

45

25m

Commercial vacuum filter system components– Show and discuss various components of a vacuum filtration system.

3

46

25m

Commercial pressure filtration system components– Show and discuss various components of a pressure filtration system.

3

47

25m

Residential inground pool concrete construction– Timeline and discussion of project.

3

48

25m

Residential inground pool fiberglass construction– Built offsite and trucked in, it’s a very different project.

3

49

25m

Residential inground vinyl liner construction– Component construction rigid wall with a concrete bottom or full frame backfilled construction.

3

50

25m

Residential inground pool typical surfaces– Pebble, exposed aggregate, polished, marcite, or fiberglass over concrete.

3

51

25m

Residential deck barrier safety devices– Door alarms, self closing gates, perimeter fencing and baby fencing only work if maintained.

3

52

25m

Residential equipment pad components– Understanding the equipment and how they work to meet customer demands.

3

53

25m

Refinish with aggregate– From prep to application.

3

54

25m

Refinish with paint/epoxy– Identify what is currently on the surface is critical for a successful job. Explain prep to application.

3

55

25m

Refinish with fiberglass– Fiberglass over concrete process explained.

 

 

 

Circulation System – Circulation & Piping; Hydraulics, Pumps, Pump Motors & Air Blowers, Filters, Heaters, Chemical Feeders & Generators

7

56

25m

Required tools for what we do– Hand, battery, and electric tools that we need.

7

57

25m

PVC specialty fittings and where to use them– Sweeps, 45s, 90s, spigots, inside and over fittings. How they are used when replacing equipment.

7

58

25m

PVC solvent welding basics– Pipe & fitting preparation are the key to a joint that doesn’t leak.

7

59

25m

Tapered pipe fittings and unions where to use– Threaded fittings and union application to make your life easier when replacing equipment.

7

60

25m

Diverter and ball valves where to use– When and where to use a positive shut off valve or diverter valve.

7

61

25m

Understanding total horsepower and motor service factors– How service factor affects total horsepower and how to calculate.

8

62

25m

Understanding TDH (total dynamic head)– How to calculate TDH and apply to pump flow curve.

8

63

25m

Pump flow curve charts– Using flow curve to select proper pump for certain applications.

8

64

25m

Pump installation piping– Understanding velocity through piping is critical for proper installation.

8

65

25m

Filter installation piping– Different filters types and elevation concerns determine best filter when replacing obsolete filters.

8

66

25m

Heater installation piping– Understanding internal bypass versus external bypass when installing.

8

67

25m

Chlorine generator installation piping– Some generator cells require specific orientation, making sure you can install properly is key.

8

68

25m

UV and Ozone installation piping– Explain proper placement, flow restrictions and bypass requirements.

8

69

25m

Dept of Energy pump regulations proposed 2021– Energy saving pumps will become the standard if rule is adopted as written.

8

70

25m

Variable Speed pump overview– VS pumps due to low filtering speed save energy(money) but still have power to run spas and cleaners as needed.

8

71

25m

Fluidra VS pump programing– App or keypad programming to maximize savings.

8

72

25m

Hayward VS pump programing– App or keypad programming to maximize savings.

8

73

25m

Pentair VS pump programing– App or keypad programming to maximize savings.

8

74

25m

Single speed motor overview– Still the most common system out, various hp, dual voltage, doesn’t save any energy, being phased out but will be around for a while.

8

75

25m

Motor and seal replacement– How all pumps regardless of brand are assembled, they may look different but they are all the same.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chemistry – Chemical Safety, Water Testing & Water Treatment; Water Treatment – Chlorine; Water Treatment – Other; Water Balance

4

76

25m

Chemical transportation safety– Containment, separation, and DOT quantity rules.

4

77

25m

Chemical application safety– Improper mixing and chemicals in wrong type feeder, mistakes not to make.

4

78

25m

Chemical dosing– Once you determine chemical changes needed you must break down from purchase quantity to application quantity.

4

79

25m

FL Dept. of Health swimming pool water chemistry guidelines– Commercial or residential we use FAC 64E-9 for proper chemistry guidelines.  

4

80

25m

Pool water industry testing types available– Discuss what participants are currently using and different types available.

4

81

25m

Pool water testing procedures– Proper procedure for various test methods provides accurate results.

4

82

25m

Pool water test interpretation and imbalance correction– How to take your test and correct imbalances.

4

83

25m

Commercial chemical feeders– Chemical feeders and pumps commonly used in commercial applications.

4

84

25m

Residential chemical feeders– Chemical feeders commonly used in residential applications.

4

85

25m

Chlorine generation systems the new normal from builders– Most common brands in new construction you should be familiar with.

4

86

25m

Ultraviolet systems to enhance water quality– What you should know. Coming to residential currently more common in commercial.

4

87

25m

Ozone systems to enhance water quality– What you should know. Very common in spas and small pools but larger units are coming to market.

4

88

25m

Saturation Index interpretation– Understand customer complaints about water quality are due to balance not chlorine.

4

89

25m

Correcting Saturation Index imbalance– Using the Saturation Index to calculate corrections to water quality issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Electrical System – Basic Electricity, Safety Requirements & Pool/Spa Electrical Equipment, Lighting, Controls, Controllers & Control Systems;

5

90

25m

Basics of Electricity– Understanding 110v, 220v, grounding and bonding.

5

91

25m

Electrical Safety– Lock out - tag out procedure, something not running or on does not mean the circuit dead.

5

92

25m

Testing meters and how to use them– Types and how to use electrical testing meters.

5

93

25m

Common pool electrical subpanels– Various examples.  

5

94

25m

Common subpanels with mechanical timers– Subpanel with timer inside are most commonly installed by pool builders.

5

95

25m

Common subpanels with automation– Examples of various subpanels with automation board incorporated.

5

96

25m

Fluidra automation troubleshooting– System specific troubleshooting.

5

97

25m

Hayward automation troubleshooting– System specific troubleshooting.

5

98

25m

Pentair automation troubleshooting– System specific troubleshooting.

5

99

25m

Common mechanical timers and how to test and repair/replace– Procedure to inspect, test and repair or replace.

5

100

25m

Transformer testing and replacement– Procedure to inspect, test and replace.

5

101

25m

Pool light testing, repair and replacement– Procedure to inspect, test, repair or replace.

5

102

25m

Pool pump wiring and voltage selection– Inspection of wiring, voltage available and setting a dual voltage motor correctly.

5

103

25m

Bonding pool equipment– How inspect current equipment and connect new equipment to existing bonding wire.

5

104

25m

Chlorine generator troubleshooting and repair overview– Testing and inspection procedure for common elements of generators.

5

105

25m

Fluidra chlorine generator troubleshooting– System specific troubleshooting.

6

106

25m

Hayward chlorine generator troubleshooting– System specific troubleshooting.

6

107

25m

Pentair chlorine generator troubleshooting– System specific troubleshooting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maintenance – Routine Maintenance, Season & Special Care, Covers; and Dewatering

6

108

25m

Vacuuming, netting and brushing pool– Various equipment used.

6

109

25m

Cartridge filter cleaning and degreasing– Procedure for cleaning and degreasing as needed.

6

110

25m

Sand filter backwashing– Procedure for proper backwashing.

6

111

25m

Sand filter media replacement– Various media options and how to.

6

112

25m

Multiport valve repair, sand & DE– Understanding how a multiport valve works and what can be repaired.

6

113

25m

DE filter grid replacement pressure side– How to replace a grid set properly.

6

114

25m

DE filter grid replacement suction side– How to replace a grid set properly.

6

115

25m

DE filter backwashing and recharge– Procedure for proper backwashing and recharge of filter media.

6

116

25m

Cell inspection & cleaning - chlorine generators– How to inspect and what to look for to determine if cell needs acid washing.

6

117

25m

Seasonal preparation and operating concerns– What to do if you have a pool that closes in winter.

6

118

25m

Pool cover types, safety or thermal– Types of covers available in the market.

6

119

25m

Pool pop insurance and when you need it– Understanding pool pop and general liability differences.

6

120

25m

Well pointing/dewatering when draining pool for repair or remodeling– How to determine ground water levels and mitigate them during a project.

 

The 16hr PHTA Certified Pool/Spa Operator (CPO) program is based on the Pool & Spa Operator Handbook and Pool Math Workbook included with class:

Ch 1- Pool & Spa Management                        

Ch 2- Regulations & Guidelines

Ch 3- Essential Calculations                              

Ch 4- Pool Water Contamination

Ch 5- Disinfection                                                

Ch 6- Water Balance

Ch 7- Pool & Spa Water Problems                      

Ch 8- Chemical Testing

Ch 9- Chemical Feed & Control                           

Ch 10- Water Circulation

Ch 11- Pool & Spa Filtration                                 

Ch 12- Heating & Air Circulation

Ch 13- Spa & Therapy Operations                      

Ch 14- Facility Safety

Ch 15- Keeping Records                                         

Ch 16- Maintenance Systems

Ch 17- Troubleshooting                                         

Ch 18- Facility Renovation & Design

Also included in appendix:

The Virginia Graeme Baker Pool & Spa Safety Act

Revised Americans with Disability Act Regulations                                                                            

 The PHTA CPO©  Training Program for

Swimming Pool Operation and Management

 What is the PHTA CPO© Program?

The Pool & Hot Tub Alliance CPO© Training Program provides training for efficient, effective, economical and safe use of swimming pools and spas.   The PHTA CPO© training program is beneficial to operators, owners, managers, service companies, public health officers or anyone who has interaction with an aquatic facility. Operators will manage the facility more economically, efficiently and safer after taking the course and becoming certified PHTA CPO©s. 

To become a PHTA CPO©, a person must complete 14-16 hours of instruction and pass a written exam.  The PHTA CPO© training program is a national and international program widely accepted by health officials.  It is a requirement for commercial pool operators in many states and/or localities.  To date, over 75,000 PHTA CPO©s have been certified by the PHTA. 

Benefits of the PHTA CPO© Course

·         Proven educational tool

·         Widely accepted by local and state authorities

·         Covers all topics necessary for pool operators including a section for local and state codes.

·         Provides 14-16 hours of uniform instruction

·         Comprehensive textbook which can also be used as a reference tool

·         Successful completion of a written exam is required for certification

·         All courses are taught by certified PHTA CPO© instructors

·         PHTA CPO© certification is recognized nationally and internationally

General Information About the PHTA CPO© Course

·         Each student receives 14-16 hours of instruction by a certified instructor who is specifically trained to communicate the basic skills necessary to operate a pool or spa facility.  

·         The course is intensive and covers pool and spa chemistry, testing, treatment, filtration, maintenance, automatic feeding equipment, government requirements, etc.  

·         After completion of the instruction, the student must pass a written examination. 

·         Certification is valid five years, at which time a refresher course and/or a re-examination must be passed.

61G4-15.001Qualification for Certification.

(5) As an alternative to the experience required under sections 489.111(2)(c)1.-3., F.S., an applicant for certification as a swimming pool/spa servicing contractor must submit proof that the applicant meets the requirements of section 489.111(2)(c)6.d., F.S., by demonstrating one year of proven experience related to the scope of work of a swimming pool/spa servicing contractor as defined in section 489.105(3)(l), F.S., performed under the supervision of a certified or registered commercial pool/spa, residential pool/spa, or pool/spa servicing contractor, and demonstrating satisfactory completion of a sixty-hour course of instruction, approved by the Board pursuant to rule 61G4-18.004, F.A.C., and conducted by a course provider registered pursuant to rule 61G4-18.003, F.A.C., that consists of the following:

 

(a) One (1) hour each of instruction covering workers’ compensation insurance, workplace safety, contracting business practices, and the pool safety equipment provisions of chapter 515, F.S., and the Florida Building Code;

(b) Sixteen (16) hours of instruction consisting of the Certified Pool Operator Course of the National Swimming Pool Foundation or a substantially equivalent course. Training courses approved by the Department of Health pursuant to rule 64E-9.018, F.A.C., shall be deemed substantially equivalent courses; and

(c) Forty (40) hours of instruction utilizing an up to date publication from any National recognized swimming pool association, or substantially equivalent materials, and including instruction on the following topics: Structures – Pool Structures & Finishes; Spa & Hot Tub Structures, Finishes & Equipment Packs; Circulation System – Circulation & Piping; Hydraulics – Pumps, Pump Motors & Air Blowers, Filters, Heaters, Chemical Feeders & Generators; Chemistry – Chemical Safety, Water Testing & Water Treatment; Water Treatment – Chlorine; Water Treatment – Other; Water Balance; Electrical System – Basic Electricity, Safety Requirements & Pool/Spa Electrical Equipment, Lighting, Controls, Controllers & Control Systems; Maintenance – Routine Maintenance, Season & Special Care, Covers; and Dewatering.

 

Rulemaking Authority 489.108 FS. Law Implemented 489.111 FS. History–New 1-6-80, Amended 12-16-80, 6-30-82, 4-11-83, Formerly 21E-15.01, Amended 12-11-90, 8-21-91, 4-16-92, Formerly 21E-15.001, Amended 7-18-94, 12-16-01, 2-6-03, 6-23-04, 1-15-07, 6-19-07,  11-26-08, 4-22-12, 1-5-17, 9-30-19.

 

Title XXXII
REGULATION OF PROFESSIONS AND OCCUPATIONS

Chapter 489
CONTRACTING
SECTION 11

Licensure by examination

489.111 Licensure by examination.

(1) Any person who desires to be certified shall apply to the department in writing.
(2) A person shall be eligible for licensure by examination if the person:
(a) Is 18 years of age;
(b) Is of good moral character; and
(c) Meets eligibility requirements according to one of the following criteria:
1. Has received a baccalaureate degree from an accredited 4-year college in the appropriate field of engineering, architecture, or building construction and has 1 year of proven experience in the category in which the person seeks to qualify. For the purpose of this part, a minimum of 2,000 person-hours shall be used in determining full-time equivalency.
2. Has a total of at least 4 years of active experience as a worker who has learned the trade by serving an apprenticeship as a skilled worker who is able to command the rate of a mechanic in the particular trade or as a foreman who is in charge of a group of workers and usually is responsible to a superintendent or a contractor or his or her equivalent, provided, however, that at least 1 year of active experience shall be as a foreman.
3. Has a combination of not less than 1 year of experience as a foreman and not less than 3 years of credits for any accredited college-level courses; has a combination of not less than 1 year of experience as a skilled worker, 1 year of experience as a foreman, and not less than 2 years of credits for any accredited college-level courses; or has a combination of not less than 2 years of experience as a skilled worker, 1 year of experience as a foreman, and not less than 1 year of credits for any accredited college-level courses. All junior college or community college-level courses shall be considered accredited college-level courses.
4.a. An active certified residential contractor is eligible to take the building contractors’ examination if he or she possesses a minimum of 3 years of proven experience in the classification in which he or she is certified.
b. An active certified residential contractor is eligible to take the general contractors’ examination if he or she possesses a minimum of 4 years of proven experience in the classification in which he or she is certified.
c. An active certified building contractor is eligible to take the general contractors’ examination if he or she possesses a minimum of 4 years of proven experience in the classification in which he or she is certified.
5.a. An active certified air-conditioning Class C contractor is eligible to take the air-conditioning Class B contractors’ examination if he or she possesses a minimum of 3 years of proven experience in the classification in which he or she is certified.
b. An active certified air-conditioning Class C contractor is eligible to take the air-conditioning Class A contractors’ examination if he or she possesses a minimum of 4 years of proven experience in the classification in which he or she is certified.
c. An active certified air-conditioning Class B contractor is eligible to take the air-conditioning Class A contractors’ examination if he or she possesses a minimum of 1 year of proven experience in the classification in which he or she is certified.
6.a. An active certified swimming pool servicing contractor is eligible to take the residential swimming pool contractors’ examination if he or she possesses a minimum of 3 years of proven experience in the classification in which he or she is certified.
b. An active certified swimming pool servicing contractor is eligible to take the swimming pool commercial contractors’ examination if he or she possesses a minimum of 4 years of proven experience in the classification in which he or she is certified.
c. An active certified residential swimming pool contractor is eligible to take the commercial swimming pool contractors’ examination if he or she possesses a minimum of 1 year of proven experience in the classification in which he or she is certified.
d. An applicant is eligible to take the swimming pool/spa servicing contractors’ examination if he or she has satisfactorily completed 60 hours of instruction in courses related to the scope of work covered by that license and approved by the Construction Industry Licensing Board by rule and has at least 1 year of proven experience related to the scope of work of such a contractor.
(3)(a) The board may refuse to certify an applicant for failure to satisfy the requirement of good moral character only if:
1. There is a substantial connection between the lack of good moral character of the applicant and the professional responsibilities of a certified contractor; and
2. The finding by the board of lack of good moral character is supported by clear and convincing evidence.
(b) When an applicant is found to be unqualified for a certificate because of a lack of good moral character, the board shall furnish the applicant a statement containing the findings of the board, a complete record of the evidence upon which the determination was based, and a notice of the rights of the applicant to a rehearing and appeal.
(4) The department shall ensure that a sensitivity review committee has been established including representatives of various ethnic/minority groups. No question found by this committee to be discriminatory against any ethnic/minority group shall be included in the examination.
History.ss. 5, 17, ch. 79-200; s. 369, ch. 81-259; ss. 2, 3, ch. 81-318; ss. 6, 20, 21, ch. 88-156; s. 12, ch. 89-162; s. 4, ch. 91-429; s. 480, ch. 97-103; s. 5, ch. 97-228; s. 1, ch. 2001-117; s. 7, ch. 2002-392.

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